Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics

By Rick Bernardi

"Figures often beguile me, particularly when I have the arranging of them myself; in which case the remark attributed to Disraeli would often apply with justice and force: 'There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.'"

- Mark Twain


Monday morning began this week with a bang, as a new study on Bicyclist Safety conducted for the Governors Highway Safety Association was released. A reporter from Iowa called to get Bob Mionske’s take on the study, and we hadn’t even seen the study yet. That’s how it goes sometimes.

So we began skimming through the study, and as we did, I was reminded of Mark Twain’s observation about “lies, damned lies, and statistics.” It was immediately apparent that the study was flawed. Deeply flawed. Well, it was at least apparent to us. But would it be apparent to everybody? Would it be apparent to the media? Or to the Governors of the various states?

It doesn’t seem likely. More likely, most people, including the media, and influential people on Governors staffs across the country, would read the summary and accept the statistical analysis as “fact.” And because the statistical analysis is so thoroughly misleading, so completely wrong, the study has the potential to lead to deeply flawed public policy prescriptions.

So what exactly is wrong with this study? Read on….

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Insurance Advice For Oregon Bicyclists

By Bob Mionske 

Oregon Bicycle Accident Lawyer

In some countries, comprehensive insurance policies are available for cyclists; like their counterparts for motorists, these policies cover cyclists for risks such as liability, personal injury, uninsured motorists, and theft. Until recently, comprehensive insurance policies for cyclists were not available in the United States; however, comprehensive bicycle insurance policies are now available in the United States too, and it is no longer necessary for cyclists who wish to be insured to piece together coverage from other policies. Nevertheless, some cyclists may prefer to piece together coverage from existing policies rather than purchase a stand-alone insurance comprehensive bicycle policy. Both options are now available for cyclists.

While cyclists are not required to be insured, I strongly advise all cyclists to consider at least one type of insurance coverage—UM/UIM—as essential. Other types of coverage, while not quite as essential, nevertheless provide benefits to cyclists comparable to some of the more common benefits of comprehensive auto insurance.

So what types of insurance are available for cyclists?

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Oregon Cyclist Killed in Hit and Run Crash

Driver Was Reading Text Message When He Drifted Onto Shoulder and Hit Cyclist

By Bob Mionske

Sep 02, 2014


A driver who killed a cyclist near Rainier, Oregon has been arrested and booked into the Columbia County Jail on charges of First Degree Manslaughter, Felony Hit and Run, and a misdemeanor out of Washington County for Fail to Appear.

Oregon State Police report that the driver, 34-year-old Kristopher Lee Woodruff, of Vernonia, Oregon was driving westbound on Highway 30, west of Rainier, on August 30, and became distracted while looking at a text message on his phone. Woodruff was reported to have drifted onto the shoulder of Highway 30 at about 3 P.M., where he struck and killed Peter Michael Linden, 74, of St. Helens, Oregon. Linden was killed on impact with the ground.

Oregon Bicycle Accident Lawyer

Police report that Woodruff then fled the scene, but was arrested approximately 5 miles further down the road.

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What To Do If You Are A Cyclist Involved In An Oregon Bicycle Accident

Bicycle Accident Attorney Bob Mionske explains:

A collision with an automobile is the greatest fear most people have about cycling; in fact, the fear of a collision with an automobile is the single greatest impediment to getting more people on bikes—many people want to ride, but don’t feel safe when bicycle infrastructure is inadequate or nonexistent. Although a collision with an automobile is the greatest hazard cyclists face, the good news is, it’s a relatively uncommon occurrence.

Most bicycle accidents are actually solo accidents involving a defect or some other hazard in the road or trail. Additionally, in most accidents, the rider is a child. In short, collisions between adult cyclists and automobiles are relatively rare occurrences. In fact, bicycling is not only one of the most popular physical activities you can enjoy, it is also one of the safest physical activities there is.

Occasionally a cyclist and an automobile will collide. Regardless of whether a bicycle accident is a solo accident, or involves a collision with an automobile, the accident is usually the result of somebody’s negligence (“negligence” is another way of saying “carelessness”). In a collision between a bicycle and an automobile that was the result of somebody’s carelessness, the accident could be the fault of the driver, the cyclist, or both the driver and the cyclist. However, most collisions between cyclists and motorists are due to the driver’s negligence.

Other causes of bicycle crashes involve negligence on the part of the local government responsible for the condition of the roads and trails, or failure of a bicycle or bicycle part due to negligence. And sometimes, a cyclist crashes with another cyclist, a pedestrian, or a domestic animal. In all of these types of crashes, somebody is typically at fault for causing the crash, and the cyclist is entitled to be compensated for his or her injuries if the crash occurred due to another person’s negligence. Because somebody is usually at fault in an accident, many cyclists prefer to call accidents “crashes” or “collisions,” instead of “accidents,” because they believe that the word “accident” means that nobody is to blame. In fact, “accident” simply means that the crash wasn’t the result of an intentional act—it wasn’t done “on purpose.”

Even so, although it is “an accident,” the crash is almost always the result of somebody’s negligence. If a cyclist is injured due to somebody else’s negligence, the cyclist has a legal right to be compensated for his or her injuries. Even if the cyclist may be partially negligent, the cyclist may still be entitled to compensation if the other person is also partially negligent. Negotiations with the driver’s insurance company will always focus on which party was negligent, and to what degree. If the cyclist and the insurance company can agree on the question of negligence and the amount of damages, the case will be settled. If they cannot reach agreement, it will be necessary for the cyclist to prove that the driver was negligent in a court of law in order to recover compensation for the injuries received.

Because the cyclist has the right to legal recourse in the courts, the vast majority of injury cases are settled out of court. However, because the legal and accident forensics issues can be complex, cyclists who have suffered anything more than very minor injuries should always discuss their case with an experienced Oregon bicycle accident attorney before talking with the driver or the driver’s insurance company.

What to do if you are involved in car-on-bike accidents and other crashes where somebody else may be at fault

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