Welcome Bob Mionske to the Bike Law team!

By Ann Groninger (Bike Law North Carolina) and Peter Wilborn (Bike Law South Carolina and Bike Law Maryland).

 

We (Ann and Peter) are thrilled to welcome Bob Mionske to the Bike Law Team. Bob is a guru on bike law. If you don’t already know, Bob is a Portland, OR attorney and cycling advocate who handles bicycle accidents and stands up for cyclists’ rights across the country. He is also a former U.S. Olympic and professional cyclist. Bob is a nationally-published author whose work has appeared in The New York Times, Esquire and VeloNews. He is currently a columnist for Bicycling Magazine and his column Road Rights can be read here. His book Bicycling & The Law is the first legal book written for cyclists since 1895. He can now be reached through the website, BikeLaw.com.

Bob joining Bike Law will allow us to provide the highest level of service to cyclists across the country. Stay tuned for more big news in the coming weeks, as more lawyers in other states join the Bike Law Network!

 

This article, Welcome Bob Mionske to the Bike Law team!, was originally published on Bike Law on January 27, 2014.
 

Maryland Bicycle Accident Lawyer

Let's (Not) Avoid The Real Issues


Let’s (Not) Avoid the Real Issues

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

By Editor on January 8, 2014 in News

Letter to the Editor, by Bob Mionske

RE: “Santa Barbara cyclists have gone collectively insane.

That was the conclusion readers of the Santa Barbara View were invited to reach, based on anecdotes involving exactly two cyclists. Do you see the logic? If two cyclists were doing something wrong, that must mean that all cyclists—at least in Santa Barbara—are collectively insane.

And since all cyclists have gone collectively insane, we can just ignore all of the cyclists who were riding lawfully on the same day that these two riders were behaving badly. If two cyclists were not riding lawfully. all cyclists are collectively guilty, all are “collectively insane.” Even the ones who were riding lawfully and courteously that day, and every day. Tar them all with the same brush, and let God sort them out.

By the same token, we can also ignore all of the drivers who were breaking the law that day. Speeding? Why that’s a driver’s sacred right, isn’t it? Sure, it’s the number one cause of traffic “accidents,” and virtually every driver does it, but why quibble over that, when we have far, far bigger fish to fry, like one irresponsible guy who was speeding on a bike?

Why point out that virtually every driver rolls through stop signs—the world-famous “California stop”—with a little “pretend-to-stop” tap on the brakes if they can be bothered, when we can look down our noses at a cyclist who wasn’t wearing a helmet? Sure, helmets are not required, and aren’t even designed to provide protection for collisions with cars. But if we don’t blame cyclists for not wearing a helmet, we might have to look at the real cause of cyclist injuries and fatalities, and we wouldn’t want to open that Pandora’s box. Just like we wouldn’t want to require drivers to wear helmets, even though head injuries are much more common for drivers than they are for cyclists.

What about drivers violating a cyclist’s right of way? No, we don’t want to talk about that either, even though it’s the most common cause of bicycle collisions, and has happened to every cyclist out there. Instead, let’s complain about the “cycling hell” of somebody getting some exercise once a month. Let‘s complain that some cyclist was wearing—Shock! Horrors!—cycling clothes while riding his bike.

And while we’re studiously avoiding the real issues, why not make up some imaginary laws that victimize drivers while we’re at it? In all my years of handling bicycle injury cases, I have never once seen a driver cited for hitting an at-fault cyclist. Nor has anybody else ever seen such a preposterous injustice. In fact, in the real world, it is all-too-common for an at-fault driver to face no charges after injuring, or even killing a cyclist. And when drivers are cited for carelessly causing serious injury or death, it is almost always on a minor traffic violation, like “failure to yield.” If you were killed by a careless driver who got the kid glove treatment afterwards, would you feel like drivers are the victims here? Would your bereaved family feel that way?

But let’s ignore that reality, for the convenient fiction of a make-believe world where drivers are all scrupulously law-abiding victims of insane cyclists run amok, rather than the often careless law-breakers of the real world, who injure some 50,000 cyclists and kill some 700 cyclists annually.

That way, we won’t have to deal with the real issues.

——————-

Bob Mionske is the author of Bicycling & the Law, and writes a monthly column on bicycle law for Bicycling magazine. A former U.S. Olympic and pro cyclist who was on the 1988 U.S. Olympic team with Dave Lettieri, owner of FasTrack Bicycles in Santa Barbara, Bob has since become a nationally-known cycling lawyer and advocate for the rights of cyclists at bikelaw.com
 

A revolutionary dance floor

 Have you ever wanted to dance in a particular dance hall in a special environment? If your answer is “yes”, then this page is the right one for you.

All dancers and dance fans sooner or later may wish to dance in a special place. Sometimes this may happen during a concert, or a local event. Some shopping centers organize dancing afternoons to attract more shoppers. So, dancing and music have more than just one goal.

As a matter of fact, you can find dance floor in all kinds of resorts and hotels. Dance is an important part of the entertainment strategy of such places.

A true story

Now, we want to tell you about a true story which goes back up to 1950’s. That time attested the “Rock’n roll” as a new trend and it also became very popular in a few time, thanks to the media of that time, tv and radio.

There was a dancer from Cuba who organized a revolutionary event: a dancing night into a casino. This was a great idea many owners of casinos and game halls wanted to share and so dancing stepped in the world of games and lights.

Today, you can find dance floors even in the schools and, what’s more, dancing is one of the most practiced disciplines.

Would you ever bet that…?

So, who would have ever said that dancing could attract so many clients to gaming halls? Well, that’s true, music and dancing are an important attraction for many beginners in the field of gambling.

Today, those who want to try the thrills of real gambling, have many more opportunities. The online lotteries and game websites represent a good tool to start to play.

One of the most attractive and easiest game ever is the lottery. Lottery is really easy because there are no rules to learn and no particular skill to have, so anyone could play a lottery game.

The web is today the best place where you can find good lottery platforms to play on. Just register your account, then buy lottery tickets online and choose your lottery game. With Lottery Planet online you can choose from a wide range, including EuroJackpot, SuperEnalotto, Mega Millions, Euro Millions, El Gordo de la Primitiva, UK National Loto, Powerball and many more.

Select your favorite numbers and cross your fingers. After each game, check out the page with the results to see if you got a prize.

The Bicycle Casino  More Than A Passion For Bikes

 According to the National Sporting Goods Association, more than 35.6 million Americans age 7 and older have ridden a bike at least 6 times in 2013. Plus, bicycle sales during the same year have reached the impressive figure of $5.8 billion – accessories and related parts included. In other words, there are hundreds of millions of bike riders at a global level – and this site justifies its existence by that is wishes to provide legal advice and help to all riders who have fallen victim to accidents and bike-related injuries. But bike riders have other things in common as well, besides their need to physically and legally protect themselves: a passion for their wheels and the vivid sensations they experience when cruising around the city. But have you heard of the Bicycle Casino?

 

What Is the Bicycle Casino?

 

Many bike riders also share a common interest that revolves around casinos, and if you’ve seen the Numb3rs TV series episode in which a successful card-counter who also had a passion for bike repair was murdered, you too must be familiar with the Bicycle Casino. The famous poker room is located in California and it was created by George Hardie Sr. back in 1984. Ever since, it was provided the poker enthusiasts with a large number of poker games and, including the very special games of California blackjack and panguingue. A large number of poker and blackjack varieties can also be found online on more than three thousand virtual gambling venues; onlinetopcasino is one of the specialized sites that provides unbiased reviews of top, secure, trustworthy casinos. For example, you can click here for Europa casino review and find out what sort of games, bonuses, and customer support service you should expect. There are more than 300 games hosted by Europa Casino and the welcome bonus deal is currently worthy up to 2,400 for new players, so it’s worth a try.

Getting back to the Bicycle Casino, the place was financed by a drug money launderer and the venue also became the property of the US Government for several year in the nineties. It currently hosts the Legends of Poker tournament initiated in 1995 which also comprised the popular World Poker Tour. As the first land casino that ever broadcasted live games of poker over the web via its Live at The Bike series, the casino grew in popularity for both passionate gamblers and bike riders.

Inspecting Your Bicycle For A Safe Ride

 When you get a nice bicycle, it can be exciting to just run out into the woods and forest and then continue bike riding. Even if it is a bike you have had for awhile, when you visit those mountains or trees, it can be easy to just skip off right away on that bike. However, there is a hidden aspect you need to watch out for because a bike can be incorrectly placed with some of the equipment of the bike in the wrong place. If you're planning a trip at a desert's climate ride trails or any big mountain, you need to check your equipment.

Inspecting Your Bicycle For A Safe Ride


Check If The Wheels Are Secure

The wheels are usually the two areas of a bike that can define how the ride works out. Oftentimes, you really need to make sure that your wheels are securely fastened into the bike. You can try bike riding around the area that isn't in such a big rough terrain, and you can see if it is still very stable. Holding onto the wheels and moving them around to see if they are still attached could be another good thing to remember. If you find anything wrong with your bike you should take it to be repaired before riding. While you are waiting you can check out casino banker and find a great online mobile casino.

Seat Adjustment

The adjustment of the seat is such a vital aspect of your bike riding. It is vital that you check the seat to make sure it's doing just fine. It needs to be parallel to the floor, and your knee bend should feel comfortable as you push both upwards and downwards. The locking device needs to be properly setup, and this is located under the seat area. Watch out for this since it needs to be secured into position.

Hand Brakes

The ability to break is oftentimes the lifeline of a biker. It can define what happens to you when you're riding, and you need to be very careful when biking to make sure that the brakes are in tact.

Always remember that heading down to a professional bike riding enthusiast can help a whole lot when it comes down to being able to fix up your bike and inspect it. The inspector should take a quick look at what is currently broken and unstable, and then making the right arrangements to make sure that you have a successfully equipped bike. Heading up to a desert climate and riding that bike will be more enjoyable with a bike that'll keep you safe.

Nothing Can Keep Her From Driving- And What Can We Do With A Person Like That?

When I was in law school, I used to work nights in the law library. After the library closed, I would walk to the nearest bus stop, 30 minutes away, where I would catch the last bus home. One night, I was running a little late, or maybe the bus was running a little early. Whichever it was, I saw the bus approaching the stop from a distance, and began sprinting for the stop, but I was just too far away. I missed the last bus home. I briefly considered calling a cab, but it was really out of the question for a law student with no money, so I started walking along Barbur Boulevard, back towards downtown Portland. After a walk that lasted several hours, I finally arrived home in the early morning hours.

I thought about that walk home two weeks ago, when I heard about a hit and run crash that left a Lewis and Clark College student lying crumpled on Barbur Boulevard. The student, Henry Schmidt, 20, had been riding back to campus from his job in town, when he got a flat. He started walking his bike home, when, within minutes, he was hit by a driver who then left the scene. Schmidt sustained severe injuries, including a lacerated spleen, broken clavicle, two broken legs, three broken vertebrae, a fractured cheekbone, along with scrapes and contusions.

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Cyclists say there's a pro-motorist bias when tragedy strikes

Bangor Daily News: Cyclists say there’s a pro-motorist bias when tragedy strikes

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

By Abigail Curtis, BDN Staff
Posted June 25, 2013
 

BELFAST, Maine — Two weeks ago on a stretch of U.S. Route 2 that runs through the tiny western Maine community of Hanover, tragedy struck.

A cyclist in the annual Trek Across Maine charity ride was killed when he lost control of his bike as a tractor-trailer passed him. So far, the driver of the truck has not been charged by police in connection with the accident. But other cyclists, many in Maine and others from as far away as Oregon, said they believe that the way Maine law enforcement officers handled the death of David LeClair shows a pro-motorist bias.

“Essentially, the police are motorists. They’re not cyclists. The motorists come up with a version of the events that put the blame on the cyclist who’s not there to defend themselves,” said Bob Mionske of Portland, Ore., a former professional cyclist and attorney specializing in bicycle law. “Who’s to say any different?”

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Words Escape Me

By Rick Bernardi

What does one say, in the middle of the night, when once again, a cyclist lays dead and our system of injustice gives us its grotesque pro forma ritual of shifting the blame to the cyclist, and exonerating the driver? What does one say, when over and over again, the justice we receive is nothing but a mockery of justice? What does one say, when all one feels is a cold fury at the lies that perpetuate our system of injustice? What does one say when there are no words? What does one say?

I will try to find the words.

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Are Portland bicyclists showing signs of an unfortunate new trend?

 This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

The Oregonian: Are Portland bicyclists showing signs of an unfortunate new trend?



This bicyclist pretty much had the eastbound walkway of the Hawthorne Bridge all to himself one night earlier this year. But a Portland attorney says that when things get crowded, bicyclists are beginning to lose patience with each other and fights sometimes erupt. (John Killen/The Oregonian)

Dana Tims, The Oregonian By Dana Tims, The Oregonian

June 13, 2013

As both a cyclist and an attorney who specializes in cycling-related cases, Portland's Bob Mionske knows a good deal about road rage incidents pitting motorists against bicycle riders.

But for whatever reason -- warmer weather? More people taking to two wheels to get around? -- Mionske is seeing an ugly new wrinkle this year, played out through what he says are increasing numbers of instances where two angry, fist-clenched bicyclists are facing off in the Rose City.

"I have so many friends who are suddenly regaling me with stories of fights on bikes," Mionske said. "Someone is riding along, someone else flies by them in an unfriendly way, words are exchanged and just like that, people are threatening each other with fisticuffs."

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The Truth Emerges

It was a summer evening, the last night of August nearly four years ago, when two worlds violently collided on Toronto’s posh Bloor Street. In the aftermath, a cyclist lay dead, and the driver he clashed with stood accused of criminal charges in that death.

But let’s get real.

Motorists rarely face serious charges when cyclists die at their hands. After all, cyclist deaths are “just accidents,” and we don’t want to hold people accountable for “accidents.”

Except this death was no “accident.” The driver’s actions were, according to the nineteen witnesses who stepped forward, intentional.

Still, let’s get real. The cyclist, Darcy Allan Sheppard, was Métis, and had a history of substance abuse and anger control issues. In contrast, the motorist, Michael Bryant, well, he also had a history of substance abuse and a reputation for a "pugnacious streak." But unlike Sheppard, Bryant was an attorney—in fact, Ontario’s former Attorney General, educated at some of the world’s finest universities—and a rising star in Ontario politics. For all of our comforting illusions about the Rule of Law, people like Michael Bryant don’t answer for the deaths of people like Darcy Allan Sheppard.

But there’s still at least the appearance of the Rule of Law to adhere to. Michael Bryant couldn’t just be let off without even a perfunctory nod to the Rule of Law. In the immortal words of Vincent LaGuardia Gambini, there was no way this was not going to trial.

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