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Bob Mionske and Rick Bernardi in the news.



Let's (Not) Avoid The Real Issues

Friday, January 10, 2014


Let’s (Not) Avoid the Real Issues

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

By Editor on January 8, 2014 in News

Letter to the Editor, by Bob Mionske

RE: “Santa Barbara cyclists have gone collectively insane.

That was the conclusion readers of the Santa Barbara View were invited to reach, based on anecdotes involving exactly two cyclists. Do you see the logic? If two cyclists were doing something wrong, that must mean that all cyclists—at least in Santa Barbara—are collectively insane.

And since all cyclists have gone collectively insane, we can just ignore all of the cyclists who were riding lawfully on the same day that these two riders were behaving badly. If two cyclists were not riding lawfully. all cyclists are collectively guilty, all are “collectively insane.” Even the ones who were riding lawfully and courteously that day, and every day. Tar them all with the same brush, and let God sort them out.

By the same token, we can also ignore all of the drivers who were breaking the law that day. Speeding? Why that’s a driver’s sacred right, isn’t it? Sure, it’s the number one cause of traffic “accidents,” and virtually every driver does it, but why quibble over that, when we have far, far bigger fish to fry, like one irresponsible guy who was speeding on a bike?

Why point out that virtually every driver rolls through stop signs—the world-famous “California stop”—with a little “pretend-to-stop” tap on the brakes if they can be bothered, when we can look down our noses at a cyclist who wasn’t wearing a helmet? Sure, helmets are not required, and aren’t even designed to provide protection for collisions with cars. But if we don’t blame cyclists for not wearing a helmet, we might have to look at the real cause of cyclist injuries and fatalities, and we wouldn’t want to open that Pandora’s box. Just like we wouldn’t want to require drivers to wear helmets, even though head injuries are much more common for drivers than they are for cyclists.

What about drivers violating a cyclist’s right of way? No, we don’t want to talk about that either, even though it’s the most common cause of bicycle collisions, and has happened to every cyclist out there. Instead, let’s complain about the “cycling hell” of somebody getting some exercise once a month. Let‘s complain that some cyclist was wearing—Shock! Horrors!—cycling clothes while riding his bike.

And while we’re studiously avoiding the real issues, why not make up some imaginary laws that victimize drivers while we’re at it? In all my years of handling bicycle injury cases, I have never once seen a driver cited for hitting an at-fault cyclist. Nor has anybody else ever seen such a preposterous injustice. In fact, in the real world, it is all-too-common for an at-fault driver to face no charges after injuring, or even killing a cyclist. And when drivers are cited for carelessly causing serious injury or death, it is almost always on a minor traffic violation, like “failure to yield.” If you were killed by a careless driver who got the kid glove treatment afterwards, would you feel like drivers are the victims here? Would your bereaved family feel that way?

But let’s ignore that reality, for the convenient fiction of a make-believe world where drivers are all scrupulously law-abiding victims of insane cyclists run amok, rather than the often careless law-breakers of the real world, who injure some 50,000 cyclists and kill some 700 cyclists annually.

That way, we won’t have to deal with the real issues.

——————-

Bob Mionske is the author of Bicycling & the Law, and writes a monthly column on bicycle law for Bicycling magazine. A former U.S. Olympic and pro cyclist who was on the 1988 U.S. Olympic team with Dave Lettieri, owner of FasTrack Bicycles in Santa Barbara, Bob has since become a nationally-known cycling lawyer and advocate for the rights of cyclists at bikelaw.com
 





Cyclists say there's a pro-motorist bias when tragedy strikes

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Bangor Daily News: Cyclists say there’s a pro-motorist bias when tragedy strikes

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

By Abigail Curtis, BDN Staff
Posted June 25, 2013
 

BELFAST, Maine — Two weeks ago on a stretch of U.S. Route 2 that runs through the tiny western Maine community of Hanover, tragedy struck.

A cyclist in the annual Trek Across Maine charity ride was killed when he lost control of his bike as a tractor-trailer passed him. So far, the driver of the truck has not been charged by police in connection with the accident. But other cyclists, many in Maine and others from as far away as Oregon, said they believe that the way Maine law enforcement officers handled the death of David LeClair shows a pro-motorist bias.

“Essentially, the police are motorists. They’re not cyclists. The motorists come up with a version of the events that put the blame on the cyclist who’s not there to defend themselves,” said Bob Mionske of Portland, Ore., a former professional cyclist and attorney specializing in bicycle law. “Who’s to say any different?”



Are Portland bicyclists showing signs of an unfortunate new trend?

Monday, June 17, 2013

 This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

The Oregonian: Are Portland bicyclists showing signs of an unfortunate new trend?



This bicyclist pretty much had the eastbound walkway of the Hawthorne Bridge all to himself one night earlier this year. But a Portland attorney says that when things get crowded, bicyclists are beginning to lose patience with each other and fights sometimes erupt. (John Killen/The Oregonian)

Dana Tims, The Oregonian By Dana Tims, The Oregonian

June 13, 2013

As both a cyclist and an attorney who specializes in cycling-related cases, Portland's Bob Mionske knows a good deal about road rage incidents pitting motorists against bicycle riders.

But for whatever reason -- warmer weather? More people taking to two wheels to get around? -- Mionske is seeing an ugly new wrinkle this year, played out through what he says are increasing numbers of instances where two angry, fist-clenched bicyclists are facing off in the Rose City.

"I have so many friends who are suddenly regaling me with stories of fights on bikes," Mionske said. "Someone is riding along, someone else flies by them in an unfriendly way, words are exchanged and just like that, people are threatening each other with fisticuffs."



Why Big Oil May Be Afraid of Bicycles

Saturday, December 15, 2012

Treehugger: Why Big Oil May Be Afraid of Bicycles

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

A.K. Streeter
Transportation / Bikes
February 15, 2012

By now you must have read somewhere in the blogosphere that the Transportation Bill (officially The American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs Act, or H.R. 7) being shepherded by chair of the House Transportation Committee John Mica (R-FL), is considered a distaster for active transportation. The bill has been called a variety of bad names, including "horrible" by Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, "troubling" by Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer, and "a bill only Big Oil could love," by Streetsblog.

Bob Mionske, the bicycle lawyer who writes frequently on cycling policy and legislation, details exactly why H.R. 7 is so horrible for cyclists, as well as for pedestrians and transit users.



Drunk cycling: Is Denver's new bike DUI policy harsher than rules in other states?

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

This news article featuring Bob Mionske and Rick Bernardi has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Westword: Drunk cycling: Is Denver's new bike DUI policy harsher than rules in other states?

By Sam Levin Tue., Nov. 27 2012

 Yesterday, we reported that Denver Police are now enforcing state drunk-cycling laws -- meaning intoxicated cyclists can be charged with DUIs just like inebriated drivers. Some cycling advocates question whether this is good public policy -- and a look at parallel laws around the country shows that Denver's approach is harsher than some other states' enforcement rules.



Bike lawyer: cyclists often a 'target'

Monday, November 26, 2012

This blog article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Bike lawyer: cyclists often a 'target'

Former Olympic cyclist Bob Mionske, now a cycling attorney, discusses the growing tension between motorists and cyclists as more and more bikes hit the road.


Video" Bike lawyer: cyclists often a 'target'

 





Hey, angry driver: Smile for the bike cam

Monday, November 26, 2012

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Hey, angry driver: Smile for the bike cam

As commuting by bike becomes more popular, bikers are mounting small cameras on their bicycles to document what they say is aggressive driving. NBC’s Tom Costello reports.

Video: Hey, angry driver: Smile for the bike cam

 





Stay Safe, Cyclists

Thursday, November 22, 2012

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

USA Pro Cycling Challenge:  Stay Safe, Cyclists

Story by Joe Silva

If there’s one thing we’ve learned in the past few weeks with regards to cycling it’s that no one is immune to the dangers of riding out on the roads. Several recent high-profile wrecks have once again brought home the reality that even the most capable and experienced bike riders are subject to the hazards of traffic. In early November Team Sky rider Bradley Wiggins was toppled by a van during a training ride. The Olympic champ and 2012 Tour de France champion was described by witnesses at the scene to be in severe pain as he waited for an ambulance to whisk him off to a hospital. Not long after the team’s coach Shane Sutton was also the victim of a run in with a motorist that was far more serious. Wiggins suffered a rib fracture and a dislocated finger, but Sutton was treated for bleeding on the brain and memory loss. And proving the axiom that bad things come in threes, Wiggins former teammate Mark Cavendish “slammed” into the back of a car that hit its brakes suddenly while the Manx speedster was out training. Luckily, Cav sustained only a bruised arm in the incident.



Cameras Act as Black Boxes When Cars and Cyclists Collide

Friday, July 20, 2012

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

The New York Times: Cameras Act as ‘Black Boxes’ When Cars and Cyclists Collide

By NICK WINGFIELD
Published: July 20, 2012

WASHINGTON — When Evan Wilder went flying onto the pavement during his bicycle commute one morning here, he didn’t have time to notice the license plate of the blue pickup truck that had sideswiped him after its driver hurled a curse at him. Nor did a witness driving another car.

But the video camera Mr. Wilder had strapped to his head caught the whole episode. After watching a recording of the incident later, Mr. Wilder gave the license plate number to the police and a suspect was eventually charged with leaving the scene of an accident.



Bob Mionske, Fight Or Flight

Friday, June 08, 2012

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

cdmCyclist, Corona Del Mar ,CA, Frank Peters interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske. June 6, 2012. 

Bob Mionske, Fiught Or Flight

He’s the author of Bicycling and the Law; this former bicycle racer writes Road Rights, a monthly column in Bicycling magazine.

I wanted to get his thoughts on bike riding on sidewalks, because it’s a subject that keeps on coming up. But first we chat about mirrors, eye wear, distracted drivers, riding in the rain and 3-foot laws, like the one that’s coming back around to Governor Brown’s desk again soon. Bob reminds me of the most important part of any 3-foot rule. Then he adds the motorists’ most common defense when charged with violating the rule. Can you guess?

Early on I mention Tim Kreider’s “Cycle of Fear” commentary in the New York Times, where he connects our primal fight-or-flight mechanisms to the source of our joy of riding a bicycle.

We wrap up with Bob as my judge, grading me on my impromptu response to a neighbor who asks me my opinion on bike licensing. How does Bob rate my response? You’ll enjoy listening as he elaborates on this and many other topics in today’s show.





KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske On Portland, Pedalpalooza, And More

Friday, May 25, 2012

 This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KPOJ radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske. May 23, 2012.





Do Passing Distance Laws Really Protect Cyclists?

Monday, May 07, 2012

This article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

The Atlantic Cities: Do Passing Distance Laws Really Protect Cyclists?

ANDREW ZALESKI

Cyclists in the Keystone State have reason to rejoice. In April, a new safe-passing law went into effect requiring that drivers leave a berth of at least four feet between their vehicles and road-bound bicycles. The law makes Pennsylvania one of 20 states with similar bicycle-passing requirements, a cause célèbre for biking advocates.

Most require drivers to stay at least three feet from bikers. Still, an important central question remains: do these laws make travel safer for cyclists, or are they hollow gestures that, when enacted, are easily ignored?

"A lot of times, people don’t realize that cyclists have a legal right to the road," says Bob Mionske, U.S. Olympic cyclist-turned-cycling lawyer and the founder of BicycleLaw.com.



Coexisting With Drivers: 10 Rules for Bicyclists

Saturday, March 03, 2012

 

This article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Edmunds: Coexisting With Drivers: 10 Rules for Bicyclists

Cyclists Have Road Rights — and Responsibilities

Published: 03/01/2012 - by Kathleen Doheny, Contributor

Bicyclists may feel they don't have a fighting chance on the road, much less any friends riding in 4-ton steel cabins atop four wheels. Media reports tend to dwell on unpleasantries between motorists and bicyclists, notably road rage incidents. Nevertheless, safety experts say, it is possible for bicyclists and drivers to peacefully coexist.

We have a set of tips for drivers. But Edmunds.com also asked safety experts — a bicycling advocate, bicycling-accident attorneys and a representative from the National Motorists Association — to give us their best tips for what bicyclists can do both to keep the peace with motorists and enjoy their rides.

Here, then, are the 10 best rules of the road for bicycling near cars.



American Trailblazer Bob Mionske

Monday, February 20, 2012

This article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

PEZ Talk: American Trailblazer Bob Mionske

Monday, February 20, 2012

by Edmond Hood

The Olympic road race, Seoul – the year is 1988 and it’s the first big East/West Olympic showdown since the Montreal Games 12 years before. East German Olaf Ludwig restored Eastern honour in Seoul, with West Germans Bernd Grone and Christian Henn taking the other two medals; legendary Soviet sprinter Djamolidine Abdoujaparov took fifth. But in fourth place was an ex-skier who’d only been riding a bike for four years, who says he couldn’t ride GC, couldn’t time trial and in his own words, was ‘built like a wrestler’ – Bob Mionske

Moscow in 1980 saw the US boycott the Olympics as a result of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. And for Los Angeles in ‘84 the Eastern bloc had to boycott – naturally. Soviet legend Sergei Soukhoroutchenkov won in Moscow, but that was no surprise; Soukho had won the Russian road race championship held on the same course some weeks earlier – but over one lap more than the Olympic race. That enigmatic man Alexei Grewal won in LA for the USA to even the score.

Mionske was a contemporary and rival of riders like Lance Armstrong, Bobby Julich, Chann McRae, George Hincapie and Tyler Hamilton; they went on to careers in the highest echelons of European road sport whilst Mionske became the USA’s first ‘cycling attorney' - as he puts it; 'I had only cyclists, other attorneys represented cyclists in their practice but none, to my knowledge had only rider clients.'

He recently took time to talk to PEZ about his life and times.



Why Big Oil May Be Afraid of Bicycles

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Treehugger: Why Big Oil May Be Afraid of Bicycles

A.K. Streeter
Transportation / Bikes
February 15, 2012

By now you must have read somewhere in the blogosphere that the Transportation Bill (officially The American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs Act, or H.R. 7) being shepherded by chair of the House Transportation Committee John Mica (R-FL), is considered a distaster for active transportation. The bill has been called a variety of bad names, including "horrible" by Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, "troubling" by Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer, and "a bill only Big Oil could love," by Streetsblog.

Bob Mionske, the bicycle lawyer who writes frequently on cycling policy and legislation, details exactly why H.R. 7 is so horrible for cyclists, as well as for pedestrians and transit users.

As Mionske puts it on his blog, H.R. 7:
- Reverses 20 years of bicycle and pedestrian-friendly federal transportation policy.
- Elminates dedicated funding for the Transportation Enhancements program (funding cycling and walking projects).
- Allows states to build bridges without safe access for cyclists and pedestrians, as previously required.
- Eliminates Bicycle and Pedestrian and Safe Routes to Schools coordinators in state transportation departments.
- Repeals Safe Routes to Schools.
- Eliminates language that ensures that rumble strips “do not adversely affect the safety or mobility of bicyclists, pedestrians or the disabled.”

The bill also attacks dedicated transit funding, eliminating gas tax revenue for transit (not such a bad idea) but not replacing it with anything else (definitely bad).

That is plenty enough to turn active transportation advocates against the bill. What is interesting is all the support in the bill for the oil industry, including the stunning idea of linking funding for transportation infrastructure to oil production. If transportation was solely about driving internal combustion vehicles on huge highways, never mind peak oil, sustainability concerns, conservation, or pollution, this idea would have some logic.

In the real world, it seems like an attempt to make us all more addicted to the very oil said to be running out.

Mionske puts it like this:

I think it’s pretty easy to connect the dots here and draw the conclusion that Big Oil—which spends millions of dollars on lobbying and campaign contributions every year, but reaps billions of dollars in record profits—is afraid. Very afraid. It’s kind of funny when you think about it—the oil industry, which is enjoying the largest profits in human history, is afraid of a child on a bike. So afraid, that Representatives in Washington who are beholden to Big Oil will do whatever they can to make it less safe for children to get to school. Cycling has been steadily increasing in popularity among all age groups, and particularly so with young adults. We are a massive wave representing a fundamental shift in attitudes, and that is what frightens Big Oil.

Since Mionske first wrote his piece, a group of congressmen (and woman) proposed the Petri/Johnson amendment to restore some of the cuts, and though Petri/Johnson failed when put to its first vote, it has since been offered again as H.R. 7 gets closer to vote. On the Senate side with the MAP-21 Transport bill, the Cardin/Cochran amendment is also attempting to restore local jurisdictions' control over bike and pedestrian program funding.





Coexisting With Bicyclists: 10 Rules for Drivers

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

This article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Edmunds: Coexisting With Bicyclists: 10 Rules for Drivers

Love Them or Hate Them, Cyclists Have Road Rights

Published: 02/14/2012 - by Kathleen Doheny, Contributor

Horrific accidents involving bicyclists and drivers have made headlines recently, including a 2010 collision between an SUV and a bicycle in Largo, Maryland. On the bike was 30-year-old law student and Green Party candidate Natasha Pettigrew. The driver thought she had struck a deer and kept driving, according to news reports. Pettigrew later died from the injuries.

Traffic accidents involving bicyclists and vehicles killed 630 people in the U.S. in 2009, the latest available figures from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Another 51,000 bicyclists were injured, sometimes critically.

Bicycling advocates say drivers can play a big role in reducing those grim statistics, paving the way for peaceful coexistence. It's a two-way street, of course. Bicyclists have responsibilities, just as drivers do.

For this story, Edmunds.com asked bicycling advocates, bicycling-accident attorneys and other experts to give their recommendations on how drivers can coexist more peacefully with bicyclists. In a companion story, we'll outline bicyclists' responsibilities. But for you drivers, here are our 10 rules of the road for driving near bicyclists.



Jury Applies No Penalty to Speeding Driver For Killing Cyclist Jake McDonaugh

Friday, October 28, 2011

This article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Streetsblog New York City: Jury Applies No Penalty to Speeding Driver For Killing Cyclist Jake McDonaugh

by Ben Fried on October 28, 2011

A Brooklyn jury has found defendant Michael Oxley not guilty of criminally negligent homicide in the 2010 death of Jake McDonaugh, the Post reports.

Oxley was speeding behind the wheel of a Dodge Caravan when he ran down cyclist McDonaugh at the intersection of Flatbush Avenue and Duryea Place last April. The investigation and prosecution were unusual for a vehicular violence case — police followed up with witnesses, and the Brooklyn District Attorney applied a felony charge. But the jury cleared Oxley of homicide as well as reckless driving, a misdemeanor. A closer look at the case is in order.

At 9:20 a.m. on the morning of April 14, Oxley was driving on Flatbush when he struck and killed McDonaugh, who was bicycling eastbound on Duryea. Oxley, 28 at the time, was observed traveling at an excessive speed, and a witness saw him run a red before killing McDonaugh, according to court documents [PDF]. He was driving with a suspended license and according to the Daily News had racked up three license suspensions for failing to pay fines for speeding and improper turns.



A New Breed of Lawyers Focuses on Bicyclists' Rights

Friday, August 19, 2011

This blog article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

The New York Times: A New Breed of Lawyers Focuses on Bicyclists’ Rights

By J. DAVID GOODMAN
Published: August 19, 2011

AT the law firm Rankin & Taylor, everybody’s a cyclist.

Scott Charnas, a personal-injury lawyer, has handled many cases involving New York cyclists.
One recent day, the lawyers there parsed bike-law issues, like “dooring zones” and when is it legally acceptable to ride outside a designated lane, while downstairs, each of their bikes were expertly locked to a scaffold along Broadway in TriBeCa.

The small firm is preparing to bring a class-action suit against New York City on behalf of cyclists over summons handed out for what it contends are phantom violations — bike behavior that it says is not illegal in the city. It is another sign that New York’s bike fights are moving from the streets to the courtroom.



Curing Car Vs. Cyclist Road Wars With A New Rule: "Just Don't Steal The Right-Of-Way"

Friday, August 19, 2011

This blog article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Treehugger: Curing Car Vs. Cyclist Road Wars With A New Rule: "Just Don't Steal The Right-Of-Way"
by A.K. Streeter, Portland, Oregon on 08.18.11
CARS & TRANSPORTATION (bikes)

Though a world-class cycling city, Portland lacks a bike share system similar to those in other great cycling cities such as Minneapolis, Montreal, Paris, Barcelona. Though bike sharing is considered to be important to attract new cyclists onto the lanes, lack of funds has hampered planning efforts. At first, 2011 seemed to be the year the city of Portland would fund bike sharing. But then, as a vote neared, opposition arose from Commissioner Amanda Fritz, who claimed she couldn't support funding bike sharing due to...bad bicyclist behavior.

"I may support a bike sharing program downtown when I see bike riders using downtown streets and sidewalks in a safe manner. Daily, I see cyclists in the Light rail and bus lanes in front of my office. I see cyclists riding on the sidewalks, endangering and harassing pedestrians. I see cyclists running red lights and making illegal turns off the bus mall. And these are presumably experienced cyclists. I believe a bike rental program downtown would only add to these unsafe behaviors." - Amanda Fritz, via Bike Portland

Though the idea of withholding funding to a system until all users agree to strictly follow the rules is a new line of logic (imagine canceling road improvements until car drivers were caught speeding), bashing scofflaw cyclists, or course, isn't unique to Portland or Commissioner Fritz.

In fact, holding cyclists to a "different standard" is rampant, says bicycle attorney Bob Mionske, author of the book Bicycling and the Law.

"It is hypocritical, but cyclists are held to a different standard," Mionske said. "Meanwhile, 7 out of 10 motorists admit to breaking the law."



Staying safe while biking in traffic

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

This blog article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

The Chicago Tribune: Staying safe while biking in traffic

By Julie Deardorff
Tribune Newspapers
1:06 p.m. CDT, July 27, 2011

Biking in traffic isn't as treacherous as it might seem. Cyclists rarely get mowed down by motorists from behind — a common fear — and in fact, most accidents don't involve motor vehicles at all.



The Chicago Tribune: Bike safety: My 6-year-old was 'doored'

Saturday, July 16, 2011

This blog article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

The Chicago Tribune: Bike safety: My 6-year-old was 'doored'

By Julie Deardorff, Tribune Newspapers
July 7, 2011

Last weekend, my 6-year-old was doored — the driver of a parked car flung open the door in his path -- while riding his two-wheeler with me in a designated bike lane in downtown Evanston. My son wasn’t hurt, but the driver took no responsibility for the incident and said, “I hope you learned a lesson, young man.”



Road ID: Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

To see the entire Rules of the Road series of videos and tips for cyclists (and drivers!), visit Road ID: Rules of the Road.





Advice for Drivers- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Passing Others While Riding- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Cycling at Intersections & Ramps- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Riding in a Paceline- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Group Riding- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Cornering On A Bike- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Signaling While Cycling- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Bike Fit & Maintenance- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Defusing Road Rage- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Cycling Car Hazards- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 

 





Cycling Skills & Safety- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Riding in Traffic- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Rights of Cyclists- Road ID Rules of the Road

Saturday, July 16, 2011

 





Cyberpresse: Cyclist hit by a door: Stiffer penalties sought

Friday, May 13, 2011

This English-language translation of a French-language news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Cyberpresse: Cyclist hit by a door: Stiffer penalties sought

Gabriel Béland
Press

The doors open car in a careless manner represent a major cause of injury among cyclists, says Velo Quebec, which requires that steps be taken to educate drivers.

Last Sunday, a cyclist was seriously injured on Van Horne Avenue when it collided with a car door opened unexpectedly. The man is 56 years since in a critical condition in hospital.

According to the organization, such accidents are a real scourge in Montreal. "Motorists do not seem to understand how it can be dangerous, told The Press Director of Vélo Québec, Suzanne Lareau. When we cycled, we know. The door is the bane of cyclists. "



NBC New York: The Latest Salvo in the Bicycling Wars

Friday, March 18, 2011

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

NBC New York: The Latest Salvo in the Bicycling Wars

It's well-treaded territory, and the issue of bicycling in New York City remains a hot topic. Just take a look at the NYPD ticket blitz targeting bicyclists who run red lights in Central Park.

Bicycling Magazine blogger Bob Mionske joins the fray, dissecting the arguments -- from politicians, drivers, pedestrians -- made against dedicating road space for cyclists in New York City. He asks:



Outside Magazine: Rage Against Your Machine

Friday, February 18, 2011

Tom Vanderbilt takes a look at the conflict between motorists and cyclists in the latest issue of Outside Magazine-- and interviews Bob Mionske for his perspective.

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Outside Magazine: Rage Against Your Machine

By Tom Vanderbilt

THE U.S. CENSUS BUREAU DEFINES AN "EXTREME COMMUTER" AS SOMEONE WHO SPENDS MORE THAN THREE HOURS GETTING TO AND FROM WORK.

This is usually understood to be by car. It's not clear, then, how the Census would categorize Joe Simonetti, a 57-year-old psychotherapist who lives with his wife in Pound Ridge, New York. His commute takes him from the northern reaches of exurban Westchester County to his office just south of Central Park.

It's about three and a half hours each way.

By bike.



KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske on bike lights, bike helmets, and more

Thursday, November 18, 2010

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KPOJ radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske. November 16, 2010.





KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KPOJ Radio, Portland, Oregon, Carl Wolfson interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske.





Cyclists Condemn Prosecutors Decision

Monday, November 08, 2010

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

The New York Times:  Cyclists Condemn Prosecutor’s Decision

By JOHN COLLINS RUDOLF

Last week The Vail Daily News reported that an Eagle County, Colo., prosecutor had declined to press felony charges against Martin Joel Erzinger, a financial manager who allegedly fled the site of a crash with a cyclist in July.

“Felony convictions have some pretty serious job implications for someone in Mr. Erzinger’s profession, and that entered into it,” Mark Hurlbert, the prosecutor, said of the manager, told the paper. “When you’re talking about restitution, you don’t want to take away his ability to pay.”

Mr. Erzinger, a money manager for wealthy clients at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, has $1 billion in assets under management, according to his Web site. He now faces two misdemeanor traffic charges related to the incident, which left the victim with brain and spinal cord injuries.

Cycling advocates around the country have decried the ruling.

“Even with an appreciation of the legal complexities, what Erzinger is accused of absolutely warrants a felony charge and it’s shocking that his profession and net worth has even entered into the equation,” wrote Jonathan Maus, the editor of BikePortland.org, a cycling blog.

Bob Mionske, an attorney who specializes in representing injured bikers, said the district attorney’s decision not to press felony charges was unusual given the circumstances. According to court records, Mr. Erzinger did not stop after the accident, but drove several miles to a nearby town and called a roadside assistance service to request a tow for his Mercedes. He did not call law enforcement, the records say.



WJCU radio, "The Outspoken Cyclist" Interview: Bob Mionske

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

WJCU radio, Cleveland, Ohio, "The Outspoken Cyclist" host Diane Lees interviews Bob Mionske.

October 16, 2010.





Spokes | Tipsy On Two Wheels

Saturday, August 07, 2010

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

 

Spokes | Tipsy On Two Wheels

By J. David Goodman, The New York Times
 

ON the matter of bicycling under the influence, Michael Dolan has known both pleasure and pain.

Mr. Dolan, a 33-year-old public relations strategist, reported some happy two-wheeled encounters while drunk involving the singers David Byrne and Björk — whom he witnessed “being pedaled around and screeching like a child” — as well as a “surreal” collision with a rider on a Penny Farthing.

But he also acknowledged the danger in trying to ride after downing enough alcohol to make a single speed look like a tandem. “I know one person who was killed drunk-biking, one who broke some bones crossing the Manhattan Bridge,” Mr. Dolan said. “Everyone I ride with has at least one story of hurting themselves booze-rolling.” (Mr. Byrne, for one, wrote on his blog about having broken his ribs in a drink-fueled 2008 fall.)

Still, many cyclists have dedicated “bar bikes” — cheap beaters that can be left overnight if a return trip by taxi becomes necessary — and sometimes there are so many bikes locked up near certain watering holes that it can be hard to find a place to park.



A biker to drivers: Let's call a truce

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

This article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

A biker to drivers: Let’s call a truce

STEVEN ELBOW |  Posted: Wednesday, July 28, 2010
 

It was one of those days when everything fell into place. I wheeled out of the driveway of my east-side home and picked up Winnebago Street from Fourth Street. The wind was at my back. I made the lights at Atwood, First Street and Riverside, and I was on Williamson Street. Before me was a line of lights, and with a little luck I could make them all. I was cruising at maybe 20 mph, the same as the car in front of me. Six blocks to go and the last light went from red to green, and the traffic speeded up. The car in front pulled away, and another one squeezed by, then cut me off with a right turn.
 

I skidded to a stop, staring straight down at the guy’s rear bumper as he squealed around the corner. I contemplated chasing down the jerk, but I was wheezing like an 80-year-old emphysema patient without his oxygen. So I sat there and stewed. Then it dawned on me that I could have died.



Start of Tour de Nez bike race used to remind people of ongoing problem

Monday, June 21, 2010

 

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KRNV Reno: Start of Tour de Nez bike race used to remind people of ongoing problem

Thursday June 17, 2010

Thursday was day one of the Tour de Nez bike race. Bicycle enthusiasts used it to highlight what they call an ongoing, dangerous problem. That is, that motorists and cyclists don't always share the road, 

A forum at the Nugget in Sparks Thursday came after two recent bicycle accidents in town. One of those accidents was last week. A three year old girl was riding her bike on Lewis Street when she was hit by a truck. Last month, a Tour de Nez rider was in the bike lane on McCarran Boulevard when he was hit by a car from behind. Luckily, both survived.

A bike law expert said that with more people than ever before now riding bikes, there's now more conflicts than ever. Bob Mionske is a former Olympian and now lawyer and columnist for Bicycle Magazine. He says cyclists have every right to use the road, but often don't get justice on the roadways when they're blamed for accidents even if a motorist is equally to blame.

With the Tour de Nez in town, he says it's a good time to remind motorists and cyclists a simple lesson that can save lives -- slow down and pay attention.

"It's a societal thing, we're all in a hurry, we make too many apointments, we rush to get there, when you do that you make mistakes,” said Bob Mionske. “When you make a mistake against a car, maybe it's only a fender bender but when you do it against a bicyclist or pedestrian, you take their life; we need to put more importance on how we drive," he said.

A Reno PD Sargeant also spoke. Police have received a grant to target and ticket cyclists and pedestrians who disobey traffic laws, as well as cite motorists who do not share the road.
 





Road warrior

Thursday, June 17, 2010

 

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Reno news & Review: Road warrior

Bike law expert and former Olympian Bob Mionske calls for more justice for cyclists

Bike law expert and former Olympian Bob Mionske rides with Lance Armstrong.

By Kat Kerlin
katk@newsreview.com

This article was published on 06.17.10.

On June 8, a 3-year-old girl was riding her bike on Lewis Street in Reno when she was hit by a Ford pickup. Though she was dragged for about 10 feet, she survived. Earlier, on May 12, a helmeted, former Tour de Nez racer was riding in the bike lane along South McCarran Boulevard and Caughlin Parkway when he was hit from behind by a vehicle and injured.

Inevitably, these sorts of stories spur comments from both motorists and cyclists about the lack of courtesy and often unsafe behavior each group demonstrates to the other. Comments on a Reno Gazette-Journal article about the May 12 accident ranged from complaints about distracted drivers to cyclists hogging lanes.

“Things have changed in the world in the last four years in terms of the number of people using bikes,” says bike law expert and former Olympic cyclist Bob Mionske. “It’s gotten better in that more people are riding, but it’s also put more pressure on conflict.”



Mionske: Vulnerable User Laws a First Step Toward True Traffic Justice

Monday, February 08, 2010

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Streetsblog NYC: Mionske: Vulnerable User Laws a First Step Toward True Traffic Justice

by Brad Aaron on February 8, 2010

In the second installment of his two-part "traffic injustice" series (here's part one), cycling attorney Bob Mionske covers a lot of ground. While much of it will lead Streetsblog readers to nod in knowing agreement, what struck us is the way Mionske exposes how a transportation system so dominated by multi-ton vehicles has basically absolved drivers of responsibility when it comes to interactions with actual people.



KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske on the 2030 Portland Bicycle Plan

Thursday, February 04, 2010

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link. 

KPOJ radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske on Portland's 2030 Bicycle Master Plan.

February 4, 2010
 





Doctor's prison sentence isn't a sea change for cyclists

Monday, January 11, 2010

This opinion article by Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

The Los Angeles Times: Doctor's prison sentence isn't a sea change for cyclists

Only after multiple assaults was the motorist in the Mandeville Canyon incident finally punished. It should never have gone that far.



Judge: Woman hit in unpainted bike lane is not protected by law

Friday, December 18, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

Bikeportland: Judge: Woman hit in unpainted bike lane is not protected by law

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Editor-in-Chief) on December 18th, 2009 at 10:26 am

When Portlander Rob Daray witnessed a right-hook collision on his commute home last summer he thought it was obvious who was at fault. So did the police officer who cited the operator of the motor vehicle for “failure to yield to a bicycle.” Even the woman driving the car admitted she made an abrupt right turn without checking her blind spots.

But when the case came up in traffic court, the judge came to a different conclusion and now Mr. Daray and others familiar with this are worried that people who ride bicycles are vulnerable — not just on the street, but in the legal system as well.



Stop. Yield.

Tuesday, December 01, 2009

 This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

Philadelphia CityPaper: Stop. Yield.

What can Idaho teach us about bike/car relations?

by Brian Howard

Published: Dec 1, 2009

The bike wars in Philadelphia have reached a fever pitch, where vitriol breeds rage breeds illogic — in the streets (see Fletcher, Rachel) and on message boards (see all bike posts on The Clog).

While there are certainly cyclists out there engaging in egregious and dangerous behavior, most of the invective seems to stem from stopping. Or rather, not stopping.



Troubles in Philly, Lessons for New York?

Tuesday, December 01, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

The New York Times: Troubles in Philly, Lessons for New York?

By J. DAVID GOODMAN

The animosity that some cyclists and pedestrians feel for one another — well-documented in comment wildfires on this blog and elsewhere — simmers just below the surface of shared urban streets, as seemingly inevitable a part of city life as the steam rising through manhole covers. Just as inevitably, every once in a while these tensions boil over, usually in response to a coincidence of tragic accidents.



The Los Angeles Times: Bicyclists should stay on the defensive to stay safe

Sunday, November 01, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

The Los Angeles Times: Bicyclists should stay on the defensive to stay safe

Bicyclists must obey all the traffic laws that motorists do, but safety tactics may also help riders avoid accidents.

A bike commuter rides amongst cars in L.A. traffic. (Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times)

RELATED
How to minimize accidents between autos and bicycles
Bikes and cars: Can we share the road?
L.A.-area biking resources

By Christie Aschwanden
November 2, 2009

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration statistics show that the following were five of the most frequently reported fatal bike-vehicle accidents from 2004 through 2008. Here, our urban cycling experts outline the best ways to avoid them -- and offer some other safety tips besides.



The Toronto Star: Bryant and bike courier a class issue

Friday, September 18, 2009

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The Toronto Star: Bryant and bike courier a class issue

Sep 18, 2009 04:30 AM
ANTONIA ZERBISIAS

"A journalist's job is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable."

Attributed to American critic H.L. Mencken (1880-1956)

On Sept. 1, after former Ontario attorney-general Michael Bryant was charged with "criminal negligence causing death" and "dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing death," there wasn't much comforting the afflicted.

Anyway, bicycle courier Darcy Allan Sheppard was more than afflicted.



Streetsblog: Blaming Cyclists for Dangerous Roads: It Goes Way Back

Thursday, September 17, 2009

This news article featuring Rick Bernardi has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

Streetsblog: Blaming Cyclists for Dangerous Roads: It Goes Way Back

by Sarah Goodyear on September 17, 2009

On Bicyclelaw.com yesterday, there was a terrible story out of Canada about a crash involving a reckless motorist and law-abiding cyclists.

What was the response to the shocking case of careless driving, which left five bikers gravely injured? The local police initiated a ticket blitz aimed at…cyclists breaking the law (one of the offenses often cited was a failure to have a bell on the bicycle). It's reminiscent of the recent crackdown on jaywalking in Savannah in response to a pedestrian death.

Rick Bernardi writes on the blog that people on bikes should certainly obey the rules of the road. But:



Bicycling and the Law

Thursday, August 27, 2009

This book review of Bicycling & the Law has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

Red Kite Prayer: Bicycling and the Law

August 27, 2009 by Padraig

When I was a newbie, Eddie B.’s book, “Bicycle Road Racing,” was considered a must-read for anyone who was serious about bike racing. It’s the one and only book I can think of that experienced riders uniformly told me I should read. Of course, “Bicycle Road Racing” was only a necessity to those riders who wished to race. Today, there are as many books on how to be fast as there are flavors of ice cream at Baskin-Robbins.

I never believed there was a single book that each and every cyclist should read, at least, not until now.



Streetsblog: Road Rage Victim's Reputation Smeared Until Proven Innocent

Monday, August 17, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

Streetsblog: Road Rage Victim’s Reputation Smeared Until Proven Innocent

by Ben Fried on August 17, 2009

 

Ray Bengen, pictured on the sidewalk below his assailant, is paying a steep price for defending himself while riding in the Ninth Avenue bike lane. 



KBOO Interview: Bob Mionske On Bicycle Justice

Sunday, June 21, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KBOO, Portland, OR, Radio Bike Show interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske on bicycle justice.

June 30, 2009





L.A. Streetsblog: Cycling and the Law: Where Does Education Begin?

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

L.A. Streetsblog: Cycling and the Law: Where Does Education Begin?

by Sarah Goodyear on May 6, 2009

What's the law where you are? Photo by tandemracer via Flickr.

Today, in honor of bike month on the Streetsblog Network, we hear from a cyclist in Long Beach, California, who was forced into the position of (unsuccessfully) educating a police officer about the right of a bike to ride safely out of the door zone. This via the Long Beach Cyclists blog:



Silent Sports Sounds Off: North Suburb of Chicago Adopts New Bike Ordinances

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Silent Sports Sounds Off: North suburb of Chicago adopts new bike ordinances

The north Chicago suburb of Barrington Hills has adopted new ordinances aimed at the increasing number of cyclists enjoying its roads and picturesque rural surroundings. The new rules, which the village police intend to enforce this spring and summer, mandate single-file riding only and prohibit negligent use of a bicycle.

I passed the news of the new biking ordinances on to Bob Mionske, an attorney specializing in bicycling law who wrote the book Bicycling and the Law and writes a column on the subject.

I received Mionske’s response last night:



Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Mionske moves to Bicycling Magazine

Monday, February 09, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Mionske moves to Bicycling Magazine

By Tom Held of the Journal Sentinel
Feb. 9, 2009

Wisconsin native Bob Mionske has changed cycling teams, in a journalistic sense.



KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske on Oregon's proposed "Stop as Yield" law

Monday, January 26, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KPOJ radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske on Oregon's proposed "Stop as Yield" law

January 26, 2009





Streetsblog: Midtown Police Refuse to Help Hit-and Run Pedicab Victim

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Streetsblog: Midtown Police Refuse to Help Hit-and-Run Pedicab Victim
by Ben Fried on January 21, 2009

NYPD "Broken Windows" Strategy Does Not Apply to Traffic Crime

Last month a grand jury indicted officer Patrick Pogan for leveling cyclist Christopher Long during a Critical Mass ride and lying about it afterward. For all the satisfaction one may derive from seeing justice grind forward in that case, the Pogan assault is something of a rarity -- police aggression caught on tape, making the cover-up utterly transparent and leaving a media storm in its wake. The more common -- and pressing -- problem for pedestrians and cyclists is the routine NYPD response to traffic violations that cause them injury and harm.

Ethan Haymes is still waiting for a response to his report of a hit-and-run collision.



Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Mionske returns to Madison and road rage

Thursday, December 11, 2008

Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Mionske returns to Madison and road rage

By Tom Held of the Journal Sentinel
Dec. 11, 2008

News of a bicyclist vs. bicyclist road rage encounter drew Bob Mionske's attention back to his college days at the University of Wisconsin Madison and his first meeting with Colin O'Brien, the victim in this troubling tale.



BikeRadar.com Interview: Specialized Designer Robert Egger

Saturday, September 13, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

BikeRadar.com Interview: Specialized designer Robert Egger
By Gary Boulanger, US editor

Specialized design director Robert Egger. (Specialized Bicycles)

For years, the mantra at Specialized has been 'Innovate or Die.' Much of what Specialized has done in its nearly 35 years in business has been to innovate in its design and functionality, and that responsibility falls squarely on the 46-year-old shoulders of chief design director Robert Egger. BikeRadar recently spent time with Egger, both in his design studio at Specialized's Morgan Hill, California headquarters and with him and his wife Sandy at their 50-acre Moto Villa in nearby Watsonville.



Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Mionske Pedals To The Depths of Anti-Cyclist Road Rage

Tuesday, September 09, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Milwukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Mionske pedals to the depths of anti-cyclist road rage

By Tom Held
Sept. 9, 2008

Wisconsin native Bob Mionske has penned a remarkably thoughtful exploration of the conflicts between motorists and cyclists, and the road rage phenomenon.



Cyclisme: Bob Mionske Practices Law

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2008

Cyclisme: Bob Mionske practices Law


American Cycling Lore

b.i.k.e. Board Member Bob Mionske, didn't change after he finished fourth in the Olympic Road Race. Nor did he change when Captain of the USA Cycling National Team and a young triathalon Natz Champ named Lance Armstrong was invited to join the team.

Bob was destined for the Law, and for the intellectual realm. His long running column in Velo News recently became a highly touted book about cycling legalities.



KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske On Oregon's Proposed Helmet Law

Monday, August 04, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link. 

KPOJ Radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske on Oregon's proposed helmet law.

August 4, 2008





StreetsWiki: Bicycle Crashes- Culpability

Monday, August 04, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

StreetsWiki: Bicycle Crashes - Culpability

Data on bicycle crashes appear to indicate that bicyclists, either by falling or disobeying road rules, are most often responsible for their own collisions [1, 2, 3] . However, legitimate questions have been raised about some of these data, and the seemingly slap-dash methods that police use to report crash circumstances.



KCBX Radio, Issues and Ideas Podcast: Bob Mionske

Wednesday, July 09, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KCBX Radio, San Luis Obispo, CA, Issues and Ideas Podcast: Bob Mionske

July 9, 2008 





Crit Corner NewsBlog: Bicycling and Your Rights... Are You Up To Speed?

Tuesday, July 08, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Crit Corner Newsblog: Bicycling and your Rights… are you up to speed?

July 8, 2008

Filed under: Race Day — sloroots @ 10:47 pm

Bob Mionske called in today from Portland for an interview with KCBX FM 90.1 to promote the Pedal to the People Benefit, to be held on Saturday the 19th at 5:30pm.



KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske on Anti-Cyclist Bias

Monday, June 30, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KPOJ Radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bike lawyer Bob Mionske on anti-cyclist bias

June 30, 2008





KCOL Interview: Bob Mionske On The Conflict Between Cyclists and the Larimer County Sheriff

Monday, June 09, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KCOL Radio, Wellington, CO, the Keith and Gale Show interviews bicycle attorney Bob Mionske on the conflict between cyclists and the Larimer County Sheriff.

June 9, 2008





Bikescape Podcast: Police and Media Get it Wrong in Bike Fatalities

Sunday, May 18, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Bikescape Podcast: Police and media get it wrong in bike fatalities

May 18, 2008

Bikescape revisits the March killings of Kristie Gough and Matt Peterson during a training ride in the Bay Area by a sheriff's deputy who crossed onto the wrong side of the road and hit them head-on. We speak with bicycle lawyer and Velo News columnist Bob Mionske about police bias in this case and toward cyclists in general. Next, we meet with San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Executive Director Leah Shahum to get to the bottom of the shameful blame the victim attitude taken by the mainstream media and how we can shape public attitudes. Then we look at a new podcast by James Howard Kunstler and check out the events calendar. 





Outside: Rules of the Road

Thursday, May 01, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Outside Magazine: Rules of the Road

By Bob Mionske


1. Traffic laws They apply when you're on your bike. The exception is Idaho, where cyclists can treat stop signs like yield signs.

2. iPods Most states allow cycling with music players. But just because it's legal doesn't mean it's smart.

3. Brakes Fixed-gear riders, listen up. Most states require brakes on bikes. And even if your state doesn't, insurance companies can use the absence of brakes to deny accident compensation.

4. Middle fingers The Supreme Court says it's not obscene, but some local laws might consider the gesture "fighting words." Our recommendation: Keep all ten fingers on the bars.

5. ID No state requires you to have a driver's license to ride a bike, but you will usually be required to produce some form of government-issued identification if you're stopped for a traffic violation. We recommend using your passport and riding in Italy as much as possible.

6. Public peeing The law treats this as if you were drunk outside a bar—you can get cited for it anywhere.

7. BUI Many states have strict laws against bicycling under the influence—Oregon, for instance, applies the same penalties for BUI as DUI. Seattle bar-hoppers get off easy, though: In Washington State, you cannot be arrested, no matter how drunk you are—although you can be taken into protective custody.

8. Helmets There's some form of helmet law in every state (for a complete list, visit the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute at helmets.org).

9. Visibility Most states require lights and reflectors in low-visibility conditions, though almost any light, no matter how dim, will suffice.

10. Insurance There are no comprehensive policies for cyclists available in the U.S. However, you can piece together solid coverage from your existing policies: homeowner's (theft), medical (injury), and auto (liability and injury).

A two-time Olympic cyclist, attorney Bob Mionske is the author of Bicycling & the Law.





The Chicago Tribune: Walking Off The Anger

Sunday, April 27, 2008

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The Chicago Tribune: WALKING OFF THE ANGER

Rage between cars, bikes is a vicious wheel

By Kevin Williams and Editor Of The Tribunes On The Town Section
April 27, 2008

We’re mad as hell, and it’s all because of the wheel. Cyclists are dropping, and the whole bike-versus-car showdown has become a tinderbox. This should make any sane person slow down and think. Instead, it inspiresinvective. Just look at Internet message boards, like the Tribune’s, for proof:

“Those bikers had it coming. They don’t obey traffic laws,” says a motorist.

“SUV-driving pigs hog the road and waste resources as they try to kill me,”says a cyclist.



KXNO: Kim West Radio Cycling Hour Interviews Bob Mionske on the Right to the Road

Sunday, April 27, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KXNO Radio, Des Moines, IA, Kim West interviews bike lawyer Bob Mionske on the Right to the Road.

April 27, 2008 





KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske on Anti-Cyclist Bias

Wednesday, April 23, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KPOJ Radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bike lawyer Bob Mionske on anti-cyclist bias. Also discussed: Paris' Velib program.

April 23, 2008





Bikescape Podcast: Bob Mionske Speaks on Bicycling & the Law at the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition

Monday, April 07, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

Monday, April 07, 2008

Bikescape Podcast: Bob Mionske Speaks on Bicycling & the Law at the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition

Two time U.S. Olympic cyclist and 1990 U.S. National Champion, Bob Mionske went on to practice law and now advocates for cyclists. His new book Bicycling and the Law: Your Rights as a Cyclist is a must read for activists. Bob also writes the Legally Speaking column in the Velo News.

He gave a talk at the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition last month and Bikescape captured it for you here. 





BikePortland.org: Portland In The Spotlight On The National Stage

Wednesday, March 05, 2008

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BikePortland.org: Portland in the spotlight on the national stage

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Editor) on March 5th, 2008 at 9:18 pm

This story is part of my ongoing coverage of the 2008 National Bike Summit. See the rest of my coverage here.

Roger Geller, Jerry Norquist, Scott Bricker, and
Veronica Rinard formed part of a dream team
of Portland bike advocates that filled in
for Commissioner Sam Adams at lunch today.
(Photos © J. Maus)

From the opening speech that was given by a former Portland City Commissioner (Earl Blumenauer) to the last event of the day which was headlined by a Portland-based lawyer (Bob Mionske) and just about everything in between, Portland was all over the National Bike Summit today. 

Today’s informational “breakout” sessions were also full of panels featuring Portland bike stars.

Among them was bike lawyer Bob Mionske. Mionske, who you might recall made headlines back in November for his claims of bias against cyclists in the Portland Police Bureau, was a panelist in a session titled, Promoting Cyclists’ Rights, Responsibilities, and Protection Under the Law. He was also the featured speaker at the League’s annual meeting which took place tonight.



L.A. Streetsblog: The Vicious Cycle of Anti-Cyclist Bias

Wednesday, March 05, 2008

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L.A. Streetsblog: The Vicious Cycle of Anti-Cyclist Bias

by Damien Newton on March 5, 2008

From the National Bike Summit:

At a panel on cyclist's rights, Bob Mionske, a Portland, Oregon attorney and founder of Bicycle Law, offered a cogent explanation of the obstacles cyclists face when it comes to public perception, police enforcement, and holding motorists accountable for injuring and killing cyclists. "Anti-cyclist bias is endemic in the police, the court system, and the media," he said, then described how bias in each arena reinforces bias in the others.



BikePortland.org: Day 2 at the Summit: What's On Tap

Tuesday, March 04, 2008

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BikePortland.org: Day 2 at the Summit: What’s on tap
Posted by Jonathan Maus (Editor) on March 4th, 2008 at 10:48 pm

This story is part of my ongoing coverage of the 2008 National Bike Summit. See the rest of my coverage here.

Tuesday night’s dinner crowd.
(Photos © J. Maus)

Ex-Portland City Commissioner and now U.S. Congressman Earl Blumenauer will open things up at the 2008 National Bike Summit tomorrow.

Blumenauer is slated to speak at the opening of tomorrow’s session with a talk billed, “Advancing America’s Journey to Embracing Cycling.” After that, the 500+ Summit attendees will break out into their choice of educational sessions.

There’s a wide variety to choose from including a session on cyclists’ legal rights featuring Portland lawyer and author Bob Mionske, and a session titled, Getting More People Riding: The Two-Mile Challenge, that features Dan Bower from the City of Portland Office of Transportation (PDOT) and Scott Bricker from the Bicycle Transportation Alliance (BTA).

Lawyer and author Bob Mionske,
will speak twice on Wednesday.

Other sessions are on the topics of Safe Routes to Schools, creating bicycle-friendly national parks, how bicyclists can play a role in the 2008 elections, and more.

After the sessions, each state will connect with their delegation to discuss Thursday’s big day on Capitol Hill. I’m looking forward to seeing the entire Oregon Team all in one place (group photo coming!).

The day will end with the League of American Bicyclists annual meeting. The featured speaker this year is none other than Portland-based lawyer, author of Bicycling and the Law, and former Olympian Bob Mionske.

Stay tuned for more coverage (along with some local news stories I’m getting behind on as well). 





Turin Bicycle: Bob Mionske's Visit to Turin

Thursday, February 28, 2008

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Turin Bicycle: Bob Mionske's Visit to Turin

When time was up for the Q&A portion of Bob Mionske’s February 28th book signing of Bicycling and the Law: Your Rights as a Cyclist at 8 PM, not many of the 30 or so in attendance were ready to leave. 



KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske on Oregon's New Bicycle Laws

Thursday, January 17, 2008

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link.

KPOJ Radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bike lawyer Bob Mionske on Oregon's New Bicycle Laws.

January 17, 2008  





RoadBikeRider.com: Reasons For Wrecks

Thursday, November 29, 2007

This news article featuring Bob Mionske has been reproduced here for our media archives. To access the original article, follow the link below.

RoadBikeRider.com: Reasons For Wrecks

Bob Mionske is a two-time U.S. Olympic cycling team member (4th in the 1988 road race) who now specializes in bicycle law in Portland, Oregon. He writes the "Legally Speaking" column for velonews.com, has a book called "Bicycling and the Law," and runs a website. In short, he's an expert on cyclists' rights and how laws affect them.

His legal work also makes Mionske, 45, savvy about crashes. According to his research, there are about 500,000 cycling accidents each year that result in an emergency room visit. Here's how they happen (numbers are rounded):



The Oregonian, Rubber Side Down: Bicycle Law - 2

Sunday, November 25, 2007

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The Oregonian, Rubber Side Down: Bicycle Law - 2

Posted by Peter LaPorte November 25, 2007 13:31PM

Portland attorney Bob Mionske's new book Bicylcing & The Law has received wide attention on the Internet. Deservedly so. He has written a researched and thorough analysis of laws applying to cyclists, from our fundamental rights through accidents (and accident avoidance) to liability waivers for group events.

This weekend, I was reminded that the risk of vehicular accidents are at the highest at intersections. It is there that decision - and indecision - by motorists and cyclists have the most consquence. In my particular case, I was entering an intersection on Cornelius Pass Road as a car which had just past me slowed and signaled a right turn. Seeing the turn signal, I slowed expecting the car to turn right across my path.



We Are All Traffic Rally, November 17, 2007

Saturday, November 17, 2007

This video featuring Bob Mionske has been linked here for our media archives.





KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske on Portland's We Are All Traffic Rally

Friday, November 16, 2007

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KPOJ Radio, Carl Wolfson interviews bike lawyer Bob Mionske on Portland's We Are All Traffic Rally.

November 16, 2007  





Press Conference for Transportation Equality, November 16, 2007

Friday, November 16, 2007

This video featuring Bob Mionske has been linked here for our media archives.





Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Pedal with the law on your side

Friday, November 09, 2007

Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Pedal with the law on your side

By Tom Held
Nov. 9, 2007

Conflicts between motorists and cyclists date back more than 100 years, almost from the moment two-wheeled velocipedes and horseless carriages crossed paths on New York City streets.

The start of the often-tense relationship, in 1896, serves as a historical introduction to Bob Mionske's new book, "Bicycling & the Law," published by VeloPress.



BikePortland.org: Another lawyer goes public with claim of cyclist bias at Police Bureau

Thursday, November 08, 2007

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BikePortland.org: Another lawyer goes public with claim of cyclist bias at Police Bureau

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Editor) on November 8th, 2007 at 4:22 pm

Lawyer Bob Mionske

Portland-based lawyer Bob Mionske, a former Olympian who writes a monthly legal column for VeloNews Magazine, has added yet another voice of concern over what he sees as a bias against bicyclists at the Portland Police Bureau.



KPOJ Interview: Bob Mionske on Portland Cycling Deaths

Thursday, October 25, 2007

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KPOJ Radio, Portland, OR, Carl Wolfson interviews bike lawyer Bob Mionske on Portland's cycling deaths.

October 25, 2007 





Bicycle Radio: Bob Mionske on Bicycling & the Law

Monday, October 22, 2007

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Bicycle Radio Interviews Bob Mionske on Bicycling & the Law.

October 23, 2007.





Velocity Nation Interviews John Loehner

Monday, September 18, 2006

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Velocity Nation Interviews John Loehner

Mon, 09/18/2006 - 8:00pm by Andy

schmalz Let's get it right out in the open, you're an ex-pro, correct? Could you describe your career path? What was your path into the pro ranks? Why do you choose to torture the poor NYC racers?



Esquire: Drunk Biking

Sunday, February 29, 2004

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Esquire's Answer Fella: Drunk Biking

My friend claims you can get arrested for BUI -- biking under the influence. Please tell me he's kidding.

No can do: Not only can you be pinched for drunk biking, but in some states you can be stripped of your driver's license as a result.

It's an area of law that lawyers call "unsettled": In California, Oregon, Florida, Hawaii, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, cycling under the influence falls within the DUI statutes; other states make it a separate violation; and many states have no specific laws that apply.

According to Bob Mionske, an attorney (and former Olympic cyclist) who specializes in bicycle law,



Mionske Proves Mettle By Still Pushing Pedals

Friday, July 24, 1992

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The Chicago Tribune: Mionske Proves Mettle By Still Pushing Pedals
 

July 24, 1992

By Paul Kapustka, Special to the Tribune.
 

The gap was the width of a bicycle tire, a few inches at best. Yet it was a wide enough chasm to keep American cyclist Bob Mionske from winning a bronze medal at the 1988 Olympics.

That prize, instead, went to West Germany`s Christian Henn, who needed a photo-finish decision to prevail over Mionske in the battle for the last available piece of hardware in the Seoul Games` men`s road race competition. But instead of settling for his footnote position in history, Mionske turned his fourth-place frustration into four years of motivation toward a second chance.

The hard work and miles of training rides paid off for Mionske last month, when he earned a berth on the three-man American team that will compete in this year`s men`s Olympic road race, a 194-kilometer test scheduled for Aug. 2 in San Sadurni, Spain.

Though now 29 and not even his own team`s favorite to medal, the Madison, Wis., native still possesses a potent race-finishing sprint.

According to U.S. men`s coach Chris Carmichael, Mionske`s ability to deliver a powerful closing ``kick`` makes him a factor in any one-day event.

``If Bob gets close to the finish and is still in the lead group, he`s got a real good shot at a medal,`` said Carmichael. ``In final sprints, he`s as fast as anybody.``



Sports Illustrated: King Of The Road

Monday, October 10, 1988

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Sports Illustrated Vault: King Of The Road

After 4 1/2 grueling hours, Olaf Ludwig's margin of victory was three seconds

Robert Sullivan



It was a lovely day for a bike ride, with the wildflowers along the road glistening in the sun and bending in the breeze. But this would be no easy spin through the countryside on the outskirts of Seoul. The men's 197-kilometer road race was 4 hours of tension and fury. "The pace was unbelievable," said U.S. rider Bob Mionske. "The Europeans and Soviets were ferocious. I tried jumping away from the pack three times. I'd be out for 10 seconds, and I simply couldn't hold that kind of speed."



The New York Times: The Seoul Olympics: Roundup

Tuesday, September 27, 1988

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The New York Times: THE SEOUL OLYMPICS: ROUNDUP; East German Cyclist Sprints To Victory in Last 300 Meters

AP
Published: Tuesday, September 27, 1988

Olaf Ludwig, an East German cyclist, took the lead with 3 kilometers left and outsprinted Brend Groene of West Germany in the final 300 meters today to win the men's 197-kilometer road race.

Ludwig, the pre-race favorite, covered 12 laps on the 16.4-kilometer Tong Il Ro course, north of Seoul, in 4 hours 32 minutes 22 seconds. Groene followed by 3 seconds and Christian Henn of West Germany finished third.

Bob Mionske of the United States had a strong close to finish fourth in the field of 143 riders from 56 nations. Djamolidin Abdoujaparov of the Soviet Union was fifth, followed by Edward Salas of Australia, Roberto Pelliconi of Italy and Graeme Miller of New Zealand.



Sports Illustrated: A Roundup Of The Week Aug. 1-7

Monday, August 15, 1988

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Sports Illustrated Vault: A Roundup Of The Week Aug. 1-7
Compiled by Roger Jackson

BASKETBALL—Dan Majerle and Danny Manning each scored 13 points to lead the U.S. Olympic team hopefuls to a 90-82 victory over a team of NBA players in the opening game of a nine-game series, in Providence.

BOWLING—DAVE HUSTED defeated Joe Berardi 233-191 in the finals to win a PBA tournament and $18,000 in Green Bay.

CYCLING—At the Olympic road trials in Spokane, INGA BENEDICT of Reno and SALLY ZACK of North Conway, N.H., finished first and second, respectively, in the all-around standings to earn the top two berths on the U.S. women's team. BUNKI BANKAITIS-DAVIS of Boulder, Colo., was awarded the third, and final, berth after winning the final race of the competition. SCOTT MCKINLEY of Carmichael, Calif., CRAIG SCHOMMER of San Jose and BOB MIONSKE of Twin Lakes, Wis., qualified for the men's team.