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Legally Speaking- The Lunatic Fringe

By Bob Mionske

Posted Dec. 19, 2002

Legally Speaking - with Bob Mionske

Attorney Bob Mionske handles sports-related legal issues. Mionske invitesreaders to submit legal questions faced by cyclists and other endurance athletesto info@bicyclelaw.com. He will answer a cross-section of questions each Thursday here on VeloNews.com.The information provided in this column is for general informational purposes only and does not constitute formal legal advice (see notice below).

The lunatic fringe

Hi Bob;

My wife and I were riding our tandem when a motorist who, after veiled threats and car “body language” intentionally hit us. He seemed to be trying to “teach us a lesson”. The responding police officer discouraged us from pursuing the case against him for vehicular assault suggesting it would be difficult to prove. The officer informed us that he would be charged with “hit and run” because he fled the scene of an accident.

We don’t want to do anything to jeopardize our position to be compensated for our damages. Furthermore, we do not want to do anything that would imply that it was an accident and not intentional. The insurance company is calling and we are quite upset about this. We want this maniac brought to justice to make the roads safer for all cyclists.

T.A.
North Dakota

Dear T.A.,

Well, did you learn your lesson? Did you become sedentary? Do you watch TV all day and drive everywhere in a big gas-guzzler? No? Good!

These guys are everywhere and I would bet everyone reading this column has been hit, nearly hit or at least threatened by a motorist. Still, when you consider the number of vehicles we encounter, there are a lot of considerate drivers out there, too.

I don’t know if you and your wife were injured or if your bike survived, but I don’t think the driver’s insurance will be paying anything to you for your damages. Auto insurance policies cover drivers for their negligence and the resulting damage caused to another party. However, in your case the driver acted intentionally and intentional behavior is excluded from coverage.

If you think about it, it makes sense. If it were not so, we could buy insurance to cover us for our poor behavior knowing any damage we intentionally cause will be paid by our insurance company. This would hardly work to deter maniacs from misbehaving and in fact might actually increase violence in society, which is why, as a matter of public policy; one cannot insure intentionally tortuous behavior.

Of course, if the driver intentionally hit you with his vehicle he committed a criminal act that is punishable at law. The various states have different statutes that cover this crime. Some rely on general assault statutes and more and more states have enacted statutes that speak directly to assaulting cyclists. Either way, it is the responsibility of the police department to charge and the district attorney’s office to prosecute a crime like this.

You can pursue the driver personally in civil court for your damages on your own or with the assistance of an attorney. Unfortunately, in almost every case I have encountered the bad driver is “judgment proof”, meaning that even if you win the trial and the jury awards you money, there is no money to get because the guy is broke. Maybe that’s why he acts like he has nothing to lose-he really doesn’t.

There are a few possibilities that may allow for compensation in the case that the bad driver is judgment proof. If he is an employee and working at the time he intentionally hit you, you may be able to pursue his employer’s insurance. But, you will only be successful if the employer knew or should have known that this guy was likely to act like a maniac. In other words, you have to show that the hiring was negligent. This is a difficult standard to prove-as it should be. If the employer had no reason to know the guy was likely to attack someone while in the course of employment, why should the employer be held liable for the employee’s actions?

Another possibility to collect your damages is if your state has a victim compensation law on the books. In this case, if the driver is convicted, he will have to pay retribution to you as part of his sentence. One last possible source of compensation is with a “civil compromise.” In a few jurisdictions, after the district attorney files charges, you as the victim can drop the charges against the bad driver in exchange for payment from him to you, thus a “compromise” has been made.
-Bob



Bob Mionske is a former competitive cyclist who represented the U.S. at the 1988 Olympic games (where he finished fourth in the road race), the 1992 Olympics, as well as winning the 1990 National Championship Road Race.After retiring from racing in 1993 he coached the Saturn Professional Cycling team for one year before heading off to law school. Mionske's practice is now split between personal injury work, representing professional athletes as an agent and other legal issues facing endurance athletes (traffic violations, contract, criminal charges, intellectual property etc).If you have a cycling related legal question please send it to info@bicyclelaw.com. Bob will answer as many of these questions privately as he can. He will also select a few questions each week to answer on VeloNews.com. General bicycle accident advice can be found at www.bicyclelaw.com.

Important Notice:

The information provided in the "Legally speaking" column is not legal advice. The information provided on this public web site is provided solely for the general interest of the visitors to this web site. The information contained in the column applies to general principles of American jurisprudence and may not reflect current legal developments or statutory changes in the various jurisdictions and therefore should not be relied upon or interpreted as legal advice. Understand that reading the information contained in this column does not mean you have established an attorney-client relationship with attorney Bob Mionske. Readers of this column should not act upon any information contained in the web site without first seeking the advice of legal counsel.

 

This article, The Lunatic Fringe, was originally published on VeloNews on December 19, 2002.

Now read the fine print:
Bicycle and the Law, Bob MionskeBob Mionske is a former competitive cyclist who represented the U.S. at the 1988 Olympic games (where he finished fourth in the road race), the 1992 Olympics, as well as winning the 1990 national championship road race.
After retiring from racing in 1993, he coached the Saturn Professional Cycling team for one year before heading off to law school. Mionske's practice is now split between personal-injury work, representing professional athletes as an agent and other legal issues facing endurance athletes (traffic violations, contract, criminal charges, intellectual property, etc).
Mionske is also the author of Bicycling and the Law, designed to be the primary resource for cyclists to consult when faced with a legal question. It provides readers with the knowledge to avoid many legal problems in the first place, and informs them of their rights, their responsibilities, and what steps they can take if they do encounter a legal problem.
 
If you have a cycling-related legal question, please send it to mionskelaw@hotmail.com Bob will answer as many of these questions privately as he can. He will also select a few questions each week to answer in this column. General bicycle-accident advice can be found at www.bicyclelaw.com.
Important notice:
The information provided in the "Road Rights" column is not legal advice. The information provided on this public web site is provided solely for the general interest of the visitors to this web site. The information contained in the column applies to general principles of American jurisprudence and may not reflect current legal developments or statutory changes in the various jurisdictions and therefore should not be relied upon or interpreted as legal advice. Understand that reading the information contained in this column does not mean you have established an attorney-client relationship with attorney Bob Mionske. Readers of this column should not act upon any information contained in the web site without first seeking the advice of legal counsel.

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